November 30, 2016

November 30, 2016

November 30, 2016

November 30, 2016

November 30, 2016

November 30, 2016

November 30, 2016

November 30, 2016

November 30, 2016

Please reload

Recent Posts

Gary Carter Commentary

November 15, 2016

1/1
Please reload

Featured Posts

Hereford Hotel

November 30, 2016

 

"Hereford Hotel"
"It Should Have Happened This Way" collection

 
Print Size: 18"x36"

Retail Price: $200 Sale Price: $95


Artist's Commentary


It is the Fall of the year and the "gather" includes some hold outs in the old Hereford Hotel. It might seem unusual to drive out tenants but in this case they are nonpaying four-legged critters, and they are only interested in seeking escape from the heat and flies. They are really comfortable in their surroundings and are reluctant to leave these four walls of protection.

 

The hotel management doesn't mind their presence for they have left this establishment many years ago and could care less about the inhabitants now seeking refuge in this antiquated building. However the cowdogs are persistent and the "gather" continues. Soon only dust will be left at this location and the only sound will be the wind until next year when the sun beats down on another herd and the Hereford Hotel comes to life and protects its' guests from the elements.


This is the fourth in a series of portrayals of the cowboy performing his duties of "Keeper of the Range" and follows other "greats" like 'Steam Heat,", Shipping Point", and "Hiring You Was Like Three Good Men Leaving". In all four you have the "no nonsense" life in the West and the day-to-day ordeals confronted by those involved.


"Hereford Hotel" is but another scene in Carter's It Should Have Happened This Way" original oil paintings. The action and characters are still around. The same jobs are still there to be performed. The cowdog is an important contributor to most phases of the "gather" . Many, though they seem to enjoy their work, find it difficult to eat after a day of nipping the hindquarters of your favorite top sirloin, encouraging movement to an area that this piece of beef had no intention of being.

Like the cowboy, the cowdog was in the big picture of control, and the mission would have been far more difficult without their assistance.


This work is reproduced from an original oil (24"x48") and is limited to 850 signed and numbered prints with 85 artist's proofs. It is printed on archival paper, pH neutral, number 1 grade with an image size of 16"x32" and a 2" trim. It has been personally signed and inspected by the artist. The plates have been destroyed after printing and will not be further reproduced.


Gary Carter

West Yellowstone, Montana

May 13, 1983


***
 

Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter