Aux Aliments Du Pays




"Aux Aliments Du Pays" (Nourishment of the Land)

Print Size: 20"x31 1/2"

Retail Price: $600 Sale Price: $250

Artist Commentary

"Aux Aliments Du Pays" is a simple statement in French meaning "Nourishment of the Land". The essence of this scene is taking what nature provides to survive a rather hostile environment that was chosen by the mountain man. In reality, it was to avoid the civilization that was brought on after Lewis and Clark had completed their exploration of the Northwest Territory.

The individual had no desire to plow fields or raise domestic animals to provise his sustenance and wanted to be left alone and to pursue a lifestyle that is impossible to describe using the standards of today. He left the plains to avoid pollution and disease brought by those that were seeking a "better way of life" than that found either their country of origin or the East where they struggled for existence.

As this evolution continued, both man and animal were forced to move to the higher elevations and more remote sections of this vast country. Once here, the mountain man had to depend on jis muzzleloader and horses to gain supplies that would keep him alive during the long winter monts ahead. His horses acted as a shield from elk and he was able to gain the nearness neccessary to guarantee something for the "pot" that night.

"Aux Aliments Du Pays" is a team effort study of survival. It joins other favorites as "When Starvation is a Flinch Away", "Camp Meat", "No Second Chance" and "In the Eighth Month of Winter" depicting the life of a free-trapper in the 1800s. This work is reproduced from an original oil (24"x36") and is limited to 850 signed and numbered lithographs with 85 artits proofs. It is printed on high quality 100% archival paper, pH neutral number 1 grade with an image size of 20"x31 1/2". It has been personally signed in pencil and inspected by the artist to insure satisfaction. The plates have destroyed after printing and there will be no subsequent reissues.

Gary Carter

West Yellowstone, Montana

February 1992

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